Active Timer

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Applies to

  • Windows 10

Looking for consumer information? See Windows Update: FAQ

You can use Group Policy settings, mobile device management (MDM), or Registry (not recommended) to configure when devices will restart after a Windows 10 update is installed. You can schedule update installation and set policies for restart, configure active hours for when restarts will not occur, or you can do both.

Schedule update installation

In Group Policy, within Configure Automatic Updates, you can configure a forced restart after a specified installation time.

To set the time, you need to go to Configure Automatic Updates, select option 4 - Auto download and schedule the install, and then enter a time in the Scheduled install time dropdown. Alternatively, you can specify that installation will occur during the automatic maintenance time (configured using Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsMaintenance Scheduler).

Always automatically restart at the scheduled time forces a restart after the specified installation time and lets you configure a timer to warn a signed-in user that a restart is going to occur.

While not recommended, the same result can be achieved through Registry. Under HKLMSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftWindowsWindowsUpdateAU, set AuOptions to 4, set the install time with ScheduledInstallTime, enable AlwaysAutoRebootAtScheduledTime and specify the delay in minutes through AlwaysAutoRebootAtScheduledTimeMinutes. Similar to Group Policy, AlwaysAutoRebootAtScheduledTimeMinutes sets the timer to warn a signed-in user that a restart is going to occur.

For a detailed description of these registry keys, see Registry keys used to manage restart.

Delay automatic reboot

When Configure Automatic Updates is enabled in Group Policy, you can enable one of the following additional policies to delay an automatic reboot after update installation:

  • Turn off auto-restart for updates during active hours prevents automatic restart during active hours.
  • No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations prevents automatic restart when a user is signed in. If a user schedules the restart in the update notification, the device will restart at the time the user specifies even if a user is signed in at the time. This policy only applies when Configure Automatic Updates is set to option 4-Auto download and schedule the install.

Note

When using Remote Desktop Protocol connections, only active RDP sessions are considered as logged on users. Devices that do not have locally logged on users, or active RDP sessions, will be restarted.

You can also use Registry, to prevent automatic restarts when a user is signed in. Under HKLMSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftWindowsWindowsUpdateAU, set AuOptions to 4 and enable NoAutoRebootWithLoggedOnUsers. As with Group Policy, if a user schedules the restart in the update notification, it will override this setting.

For a detailed description of these registry keys, see Registry keys used to manage restart.

Configure active hours

Active hours identify the period of time when you expect the device to be in use. Automatic restarts after an update will occur outside of the active hours.

By default, active hours are from 8 AM to 5 PM on PCs and from 5 AM to 11 PM on phones. Users can change the active hours manually.

Starting with Windows 10, version 1703, you can also specify the max active hours range. The specified range will be counted from the active hours start time.

Administrators can use multiple ways to set active hours for managed devices:

  • You can use Group Policy, as described in the procedure that follows.
  • You can use MDM, as described in Configuring active hours with MDM.
  • While not recommended, you can also configure active hours, as described in Configuring active hours through Registry.

Configuring active hours with Group Policy

To configure active hours using Group Policy, go to Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update and open the Turn off auto-restart for updates during active hours policy setting. When the policy is enabled, you can set the start and end times for active hours.

Configuring active hours with MDM

MDM uses the Update/ActiveHoursStart and Update/ActiveHoursEnd and Update/ActiveHoursMaxRange settings in the Policy CSP to configure active hours.

Configuring active hours through Registry

This method is not recommended, and should only be used when you can't use Group Policy or MDM.Any settings configured through Registry may conflict with any existing configuration that uses any of the methods mentioned above.

Configure active hours by setting a combination of the following registry values:

Timers.active() Is Deprecated

Under HKLMSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftWindowsWindowsUpdate use SetActiveHours to enable or disable active hours and ActiveHoursStart and ActiveHoursEnd to specify the range of active hours.

For a detailed description of these registry keys, see Registry keys used to manage restart.

Note

To configure active hours manually on a single device, go to Settings > Update & security > Windows Update and select Change active hours.

Configuring active hours max range

With Windows 10, version 1703, administrators can specify the max active hours range users can set. This option gives you additional flexibility to leave some of the decision for active hours on the user's side, while making sure you allow enough time for updating. The max range is calculated from active hours start time.

To configure active hours max range through Group Policy, go to Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update and open the Specify active hours range for auto-restarts.

To configure active hours max range through MDM, use Update/ActiveHoursMaxRange.

Limit restart delays

After an update is installed, Windows 10 attempts automatic restart outside of active hours. If the restart does not succeed after seven days (by default), the user will see a notification that restart is required. You can use the Specify deadline before auto-restart for update installation policy to change the delay from seven days to any number of days between two and 14.

Timers.active() is deprecated

Control restart notifications

In Windows 10, version 1703, we have added settings to control restart notifications for users.

Active Server Pages Timer

Auto-restart notifications

Administrators can override the default behavior for the auto-restart required notification. By default, this notification will dismiss automatically.

To configure this behavior through Group Policy, go to Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update and select Configure auto-restart required notification for updates. When configured to 2 - User Action, a user that gets this notification must manually dismiss it.

To configure this behavior through MDM, use Update/AutoRestartRequiredNotificationDismissal

You can also configure the period prior to an update that this notification will show up on. The default value is 15 minutes.

To change it through Group Policy, select Configure auto-restart-reminder notifications for updates under Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update and select the period in minutes.

To change it through MDM, use Update/AutoRestartNotificationSchedule.

In some cases, you don't need a notification to show up.

To do so through Group Policy, go to Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update and select Turn off auto-restart notifications for update installations.

To do so through MDM, use Update/SetAutoRestartNotificationDisable.

Scheduled auto-restart warnings

Since users are not able to postpone a scheduled restart once the deadline has been reached, you can configure a warning reminder prior to the scheduled restart. You can also configure a warning prior to the restart, to notify users once the restart is imminent and allow them to save their work.

To configure both through Group Policy, find Configure auto-restart warning notifications schedule for updates under Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update. The warning reminder can be configured by Reminder (hours) and the warning prior to an imminent auto-restart can be configured by Warning (mins).

In MDM, the warning reminder is configured using Update/ScheduleRestartWarning and the auto-restart imminent warning is configured using Update/ScheduleImminentRestartWarning.

Engaged restart

Engaged restart is the period of time when users are required to schedule a restart. Initially, Windows will auto-restart outside of working hours. Once the set period ends (seven days by default), Windows transitions to user scheduled restarts.

The following settings can be adjusted for engaged restart:

  • Period of time before auto-restart transitions to engaged restart.
  • The number of days that users can snooze engaged restart reminder notifications.
  • The number of days before a pending restart automatically executes outside of working hours.

In Group Policy, go to Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update and pick Specify Engaged restart transition and notification schedule for updates.

In MDM, use Update/EngagedRestartTransitionSchedule, Update/EngagedRestartSnoozeSchedule and Update/EngagedRestartDeadline respectively.

Group Policy settings for restart

In the Group Policy editor, you will see a number of policy settings that pertain to restart behavior in Computer ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Update. The following table shows which policies apply to Windows 10.

PolicyApplies to Windows 10Notes
Turn off auto-restart for updates during active hoursUse this policy to configure active hours, during which the device will not be restarted. This policy has no effect if the No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations or Always automatically restart at the scheduled time policies are enabled.
Always automatically restart at the scheduled timeUse this policy to configure a restart timer (between 15 and 180 minutes) that will start immediately after Windows Update installs important updates. This policy has no effect if the No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations policy is enabled.
Specify deadline before auto-restart for update installationUse this policy to specify how many days (between 2 and 14) an automatic restart can be delayed. This policy has no effect if the No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations or Always automatically restart at the scheduled time policies are enabled.
No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installationsUse this policy to prevent automatic restart when a user is logged on. This policy applies only when the Configure Automatic Updates policy is configured to perform scheduled installations of updates.
There is no equivalent MDM policy setting for Windows 10 Mobile.
Re-prompt for restart with scheduled installations
Delay Restart for scheduled installations
Reschedule Automatic Updates scheduled installations

Note

You can only choose one path for restart behavior.If you set conflicting restart policies, the actual restart behavior may not be what you expected.When using RDP, only active RDP sessions are considered as logged on users.

Registry keys used to manage restart

The following tables list registry values that correspond to the Group Policy settings for controlling restarts after updates in Windows 10.

HKLMSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftWindowsWindowsUpdate

Timer
Registry keyKey typeValue
ActiveHoursEndREG_DWORD0-23: set active hours to end at a specific hour
starts with 12 AM (0) and ends with 11 PM (23)
ActiveHoursStartREG_DWORD0-23: set active hours to start at a specific hour
starts with 12 AM (0) and ends with 11 PM (23)
SetActiveHoursREG_DWORD0: disable automatic restart after updates outside of active hours
1: enable automatic restart after updates outside of active hours

HKLMSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftWindowsWindowsUpdateAU

Registry keyKey typeValue
AlwaysAutoRebootAtScheduledTimeREG_DWORD0: disable automatic reboot after update installation at scheduled time
1: enable automatic reboot after update installation at a scheduled time
AlwaysAutoRebootAtScheduledTimeMinutesREG_DWORD15-180: set automatic reboot to occur after given minutes
AUOptionsREG_DWORD2: notify for download and notify for installation of updates
3: automatically download and notify for installation of updates
4: Automatically download and schedule installation of updates
5: allow the local admin to configure these settings
Note: To configure restart behavior, set this value to 4
NoAutoRebootWithLoggedOnUsersREG_DWORD0: disable do not reboot if users are logged on
1: do not reboot after an update installation if a user is logged on
Note: If disabled: Automatic Updates will notify the user that the computer will automatically restart in 5 minutes to complete the installation
ScheduledInstallTimeREG_DWORD0-23: schedule update installation time to a specific hour
starts with 12 AM (0) and ends with 11 PM (23)

There are three different registry combinations for controlling restart behavior:

  • To set active hours, SetActiveHours should be 1, while ActiveHoursStart and ActiveHoursEnd should define the time range.
  • To schedule a specific installation and reboot time, AUOptions should be 4, ScheduledInstallTime should specify the installation time, and AlwaysAutoRebootAtScheduledTime set to 1 and AlwaysAutoRebootAtScheduledTimeMinutes should specify number of minutes to wait before rebooting.
  • To delay rebooting if a user is logged on, AUOptions should be 4, while NoAutoRebootWithLoggedOnUsers is set to 1.

Related articles

ActiveMQ from version 5.4 has an optional persistent scheduler built into the ActiveMQ message broker. It is enabled by setting the broker schedulerSupport attribute to true in the Xml Configuration.An ActiveMQ client can take advantage of a delayed delivery by using the following message properties:

Check your Message Properties

The message property scheduledJobId is reserved for use by the Job Scheduler. If this property is set before sending, the message will be sent immediately and not scheduled. Also, after a scheduled message is received, the property scheduledJobId will be set on the received message so keep this in mind if using something like a Camel Route which might automatically copy properties over when re-sending a message.

Property nametypedescription
AMQ_SCHEDULED_DELAYlongThe time in milliseconds that a message will wait before being scheduled to be delivered by the broker
AMQ_SCHEDULED_PERIODlongThe time in milliseconds to wait after the start time to wait before scheduling the message again
AMQ_SCHEDULED_REPEATintThe number of times to repeat scheduling a message for delivery
AMQ_SCHEDULED_CRONStringUse a Cron entry to set the schedule

For the connivence of Java JMS clients - there’s an interface with the property names used for scheduling at org.apache.activemq.ScheduledMessage.

Active timer for powerpointActive collab timer

For example, to have a message scheduled for delivery in 60 seconds - you would need to set the AMQ_SCHEDULED_DELAY property:

You can set a message to wait with an initial delay, and the repeat delivery 10 times, waiting 10 seconds between each re-delivery:

You can also use CRON to schedule a message, for example, if you want a message scheduled to be delivered every hour, you would need to set the CRON entry to be - 0 * * * * - e.g.

Online Visual Timer

CRON scheduling takes priority over using message delay - however, if a repeat and period is set with a CRON entry, the ActiveMQ scheduler will schedule delivery of the message for every time the CRON entry fires. Easier to explain with an example. Supposing that you want a message to be delivered 10 times, with a one second delay between each message - and you wanted this to happen every hour - you’d do this: