Artifact

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Artifact or artefact A work of Art is an artifact which, whatever else it does, is capable of stimulating self-rewarding awareness - English Only forum Accumulation of Impurities-covered Artifact - English Only forum Adjective order: a rare incredibly beautiful artifact. An incredibly beautiful rare artifact. An object produced or shaped by human craft, especially a tool, weapon, or ornament of archaeological or historical interest. Something viewed as a product of human conception or agency rather than an inherent element: 'Morality is an artifact of human culture, devised to help us negotiate social relations' (Michael Pollan). Noun any object made by human beings, especially with a view to subsequent use. A handmade object, as a tool, or the remains of one, as a shard of pottery, characteristic of an earlier time or cultural stage. Artefact definition is - chiefly British spelling of artifact.

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Azure Pipelines Azure DevOps Server 2020 Azure DevOps Server 2019 TFS 2018 - TFS 2015

Note

In Microsoft Team Foundation Server (TFS) 2018 and previous versions,build and release pipelines are called definitions,runs are called builds,service connections are called service endpoints,stages are called environments,and jobs are called phases.

Artifact

Note

This topic covers classic release pipelines. To understand artifacts in YAML pipelines, see artifacts.

A release is a collection of artifacts in your DevOps CI/CD processes. An artifact is a deployable component of your application. Azure Pipelines can deploy artifacts that are produced by a wide range of artifact sources, and stored in different types of artifact repositories.

When authoring a release pipeline, you link the appropriate artifact sources to your release pipeline. For example, you might link an Azure Pipelines build pipeline or a Jenkins project to your release pipeline.

When creating a release, you specify the exact version of these artifact sources; for example, the number of a build coming from Azure Pipelines, or the version of a build coming from a Jenkins project.

After a release is created, you cannot change these versions. A release is fundamentally defined by the versioned artifacts that make up the release. As you deploy the release to various stages, you will be deploying and validating the same artifacts in all stages.

A single release pipeline can be linked to multiple artifact sources, of which one is the primary source. In this case, when you create a release, you specify individual versions for each of these sources.

World

Artifacts are central to a number of features in Azure Pipelines. Some of the features that depend on the linking of artifacts to a release pipeline are:

  • Auto-trigger releases. You can configure new releases to be automatically created whenever a new version of an artifact is produced. For more information, see Continuous deployment triggers. Note that the ability to automatically create releases is available for only some artifact sources.

  • Trigger conditions. You can configure a release to be created automatically, or the deployment of a release to a stage to be triggered automatically, when only specific conditions on the artifacts are met. For example, you can configure releases to be automatically created only when a new build is produced from a certain branch.

  • Artifact versions. You can configure a release to automatically use a specific version of the build artifacts, to always use the latest version, or to allow you to specify the version when the release is created.

  • Artifact variables. Every artifact that is part of a release has metadata associated with it, exposed to tasks through variables. This metadata includes the version number of the artifact, the branch of code from which the artifact was produced (in the case of build or source code artifacts), the pipeline that produced the artifact (in the case of build artifacts), and more. This information is accessible in the deployment tasks. For more information, see Artifact variables.

  • Work items and commits. The work items or commits that are part of a release are computed from the versions of artifacts. For example, each build in Azure Pipelines is associated with a set of work items and commits. The work items or commits in a release are computed as the union of all work items and commits of all builds between the current release and the previous release. Note that Azure Pipelines is currently able to compute work items and commits for only certain artifact sources.

  • Artifact download. Whenever a release is deployed to a stage, by default Azure Pipelines automatically downloads all the artifacts in that release to the agent where the deployment job runs. The procedure to download artifacts depends on the type of artifact. For example, Azure Pipelines artifacts are downloaded using an algorithm that downloads multiple files in parallel. Git artifacts are downloaded using Git library functionality. For more information, see Artifact download.

Artifact sources

There are several types of tools you might use in your application lifecycle process to produce or store artifacts. For example, you might use continuous integration systems such as Azure Pipelines, Jenkins, or TeamCity to produce artifacts. You might also use version control systems such as Git or TFVC to store your artifacts. Or you can use repositories such as Azure Artifacts or a NuGet repository to store your artifacts. You can configure Azure Pipelines to deploy artifacts from all these sources.

By default, a release created from the release pipeline will use the latest version of the artifacts. At the time of linking an artifact source to a release pipeline, you can change this behavior by selecting one of the options to use the latest build from a specific branch by specifying the tags, a specific version, or allow the user to specify the version when the release is created from the pipeline.

If you link more than one set of artifacts, you can specify which is the primary (default).

Important

The Artifacts Default version drop down list items depends on the repository type of the linked build definition.

  • The following options are supported by all the repository types: Specify at the time of release creation, Specific version, and Latest.

  • Latest from a specific branch with tags and Latest from the build pipeline default branch with tags options are supported by the following repository types: TfsGit, GitHub, Bitbucket, and GitHubEnterprise.

  • Latest from the build pipeline default branch with tags is not supported by XAML build definitions.

The following sections describe how to work with the different types of artifact sources.

Artifact sources - Azure Pipelines

You can link a release pipeline to any of the build pipelines in Azure Pipelines or TFS project collection.

Note

You must include a Publish Artifacts task in your build pipeline. For XAML build pipelines, an artifact with the name drop is published implicitly.

Some of the differences in capabilities between different versions of TFS and Azure Pipelines are:

  • TFS 2015: You can link build pipelines only from the same project of your collection. You can link multiple definitions, but you cannot specify default versions. You can set up a continuous deployment trigger on only one of the definitions. When multiple build pipelines are linked, the latest builds of all the other definitions are used, along with the build that triggered the release creation.

  • TFS 2017 and newer and Azure Pipelines: You can link build pipelines from any of the projects in Azure Pipelines or TFS. You can link multiple build pipelines and specify default values for each of them. You can set up continuous deployment triggers on multiple build sources. When any of the builds completes, it will trigger the creation of a release.

The following features are available when using Azure Pipelines sources:

FeatureBehavior with Azure Pipelines sources
Auto-trigger releasesNew releases can be created automatically when new builds (including XAML builds) are produced. See Continuous Deployment for details. You do not need to configure anything within the build pipeline. See the notes above for differences between version of TFS.
Artifact variablesA number of artifact variables are supported for builds from Azure Pipelines.
Work items and commitsAzure Pipelines integrates with work items in TFS and Azure Pipelines. These work items are also shown in the details of releases. Azure Pipelines integrates with a number of version control systems such as TFVC and Git, GitHub, Subversion, and Other Git repositories. Azure Pipelines shows the commits only when the build is produced from source code in TFVC or Git.
Artifact downloadBy default, build artifacts are downloaded to the agent. You can configure an option in the stage to skip the download of artifacts.
Deployment section in buildThe build summary includes a Deployment section, which lists all the stages to which the build was deployed.

By default, the releases execute in with a collection level Job authorization scope. That means releases can access resources in all projects in the organization (or collection for Azure DevOps Server). This is useful when linking build artifacts from other projects. You can enable Limit job authorization scope to current project for release pipelines in project settings to restrict access to artifacts for releases in a project.

To set job authorization scope for the organization:

  • Navigate to your organization settings page in the Azure DevOps user interface.
  • Select Settings under Pipelines.
  • Turn on the toggle Limit job authorization scope to current project for release pipelines to limit the scope to current project. This is the recommended setting, as it enhances security for your pipelines.

To set job authorization scope for a specific project:

  • Navigate to your project settings page in the Azure DevOps user interface.
  • Select Settings under Pipelines.
  • Turn on the toggle Limit job authorization scope to current project to limit the scope to project. This is the recommended setting, as it enhances security for your pipelines.

Note

If the scope is set to project at the organization level, you cannot change the scope in each project.

All jobs in releases run with the job authorization scope set to collection. In other words, these jobs have access to resources in all projects in your project collection.

Artifact sources - TFVC, Git, and GitHub

There are scenarios in which you may want to consume artifacts stored in a version control system directly, without passing them through a build pipeline. For example:

  • You are developing a PHP or a JavaScript application that does not require an explicit build pipeline.

  • You manage configurations for various stages in different version control repositories, and you want to consume these configuration files directly from version control as part of the deployment pipeline.

  • You manage your infrastructure and configuration as code (such as Azure Resource Manager templates) and you want to manage these files in a version control repository.

Because you can configure multiple artifact sources in a single release pipeline, you can link both a build pipeline that produces the binaries of the application as well as a version control repository that stores the configuration files into the same pipeline, and use the two sets of artifacts together while deploying.

Azure Pipelines integrates with Team Foundation Version Control (TFVC) repositories, Git repositories, and GitHub repositories.

You can link a release pipeline to any of the Git or TFVC repositories in any of the projects in your collection (you will need read access to these repositories). No additional setup is required when deploying version control artifacts within the same collection.

When you link a Git or GitHub repository and select a branch, you can edit the default properties of the artifact types after the artifact has been saved. This is particularly useful in scenarios where the branch for the stable version of the artifact changes, and continuous delivery releases should use this branch to obtain newer versions of the artifact. You can also specify details of the checkout, such as whether checkout submodules and LFS-tracked files, and the shallow fetch depth.

When you link a TFVC branch, you can specify the changeset to be deployed when creating a release.

The following features are available when using TFVC, Git, and GitHub sources:

FeatureBehavior with TFVC, Git, and GitHub sources
Auto-trigger releasesYou can configure a continuous deployment trigger for pushes into the repository in a release pipeline. This can automatically trigger a release when a new commit is made to a repository. See Triggers.
Artifact variablesA number of artifact variables are supported for version control sources.
Work items and commitsAzure Pipelines cannot show work items or commits associated with releases when using version control artifacts.
Artifact downloadBy default, version control artifacts are downloaded to the agent. You can configure an option in the stage to skip the download of artifacts.
Puzzles

By default, the releases execute in with a collection level Job authorization scope. That means releases can access all repositories in the organization (or collection for Azure DevOps Server). You can enable Limit job authorization scope to current project for release pipelines in project settings to restrict access to artifacts for releases in a project.

Artifact sources - Jenkins

To consume Jenkins artifacts, you must create a service connection with credentials to connect to your Jenkins server. For more information, see service connections and Jenkins service connection. You can then link a Jenkins project to a release pipeline. The Jenkins project must be configured with a post build action to publish the artifacts.

The following features are available when using Jenkins sources:

FeatureBehavior with Jenkins sources
Auto-trigger releasesYou can configure a continuous deployment trigger for pushes into the repository in a release pipeline. This can automatically trigger a release when a new commit is made to a repository. See Triggers.
Artifact variablesA number of artifact variables are supported for builds from Jenkins.
Work items and commitsAzure Pipelines cannot show work items or commits for Jenkins builds.
Artifact downloadBy default, Jenkins builds are downloaded to the agent. You can configure an option in the stage to skip the download of artifacts.

Artifacts generated by Jenkins builds are typically propagated to storage repositories for archiving and sharing. Azure blob storage is one of the supported repositories, allowing you to consume Jenkins projects that publish to Azure storage as artifact sources in a release pipeline. Deployments download the artifacts automatically from Azure to the agents. In this configuration, connectivity between the agent and the Jenkins server is not required. Microsoft-hosted agents can be used without exposing the server to internet.

Note

Azure Pipelines may not be able to contact your Jenkins server if, for example, it is within your enterprise network. In this case you can integrate Azure Pipelines with Jenkins by setting up an on-premises agent that can access the Jenkins server. You will not be able to see the name of your Jenkins projects when linking to a build, but you can type this into the link dialog field.

For more information about Jenkins integration capabilities, see Azure Pipelines Integration with Jenkins Jobs, Pipelines, and Artifacts.

Artifact sources - Azure Container Registry, Docker, Kubernetes

Artifactory

When deploying containerized apps, the container image is first pushed to a container registry. After the push is complete, the container image can be deployed to the Web App for Containers service or a Docker/Kubernetes cluster. You must create a service connection with credentials to connect to your service to deploy images located there, or to Azure. For more information, see service connections.

The following features are available when using Azure Container Registry, Docker, Kubernetes sources:

FeatureBehavior with Docker sources
Auto-trigger releasesYou can configure a continuous deployment trigger for images. This can automatically trigger a release when a new commit is made to a repository. See Triggers.
Artifact variablesA number of artifact variables are supported for builds.
Work items and commitsAzure Pipelines cannot show work items or commits.
Artifact downloadBy default, builds are downloaded to the agent. You can configure an option in the stage to skip the download of artifacts.

Note

In the case of continuous deployment from multiple artifact sources (multiple registries/repositories), it isn't possible to map artifact sources to trigger particular stages. A release will be created anytime there is a push to any of the artifact sources. If you wish to map an artifact source to trigger a specific stage, the recommended way is to decompose the release pipeline into multiple release pipelines.

Artifact sources - Azure Artifacts

Scenarios where you may want to consume these artifacts are:

  1. You have your application build (such as TFS, Azure Pipelines, TeamCity, Jenkins) published as a package to Azure Artifacts and you want to consume the artifact in a release.
  2. As part of your application deployment, you need additional packages stored in Azure Artifacts.

When you link such an artifact to your release pipeline, you must select the Feed, Package, and the Default version for the package. You can choose to pick up the latest version of the package, use a specific version, or select the version at the time of release creation. During deployment, the package is downloaded to the agent folder and the contents are extracted as part of the job execution.

The following features are available when using Azure Artifacts sources:

FeatureBehavior with Azure Artifacts sources
Auto-trigger releasesYou can configure a continuous deployment trigger for packages. This can automatically trigger a release when a package is updated. See Triggers.
Artifact variablesA number of artifact variables are supported for packages.
Work items and commitsAzure Pipelines cannot show work items or commits.
Artifact downloadBy default, packages are downloaded to the agent. You can configure an option in the stage to skip the download of artifacts.

Handling Maven Snapshots

When obtaining Maven artifacts and the artifact is a snapshot build, multiple versions of that snapshot may be downloaded at once (e.g. myApplication-2.1.0.BUILD-20190920.220048-3.jar, myApplication-2.1.0.BUILD-20190820.221046-2.jar, myApplication-2.1.0.BUILD-20190820.220331-1.jar). You will likely need to add additional automation to keep only the latest artifact prior to subsequent deployment steps. This can be accomplished with the following PowerShell snippet:

For more information, see the Azure Artifacts overview.

Artifact sources - External or on-premises TFS

You can use Azure Pipelines to deploy artifacts published by an on-premises TFS server. You don't need to make the TFS server visible on the Internet; you just set up an on-premises automation agent. Builds from an on-premises TFS server are downloaded directly into the on-premises agent, and then deployed to the specified target servers. They will not leave your enterprise network. This allows you to leverage all of your investments in your on-premises TFS server, and take advantage of the release capabilities in Azure Pipelines.

Tip

Using this mechanism, you can also deploy artifacts published in one Azure Pipelines subscription in another Azure Pipelines, or deploy artifacts published in one Team Foundation Server from another Team Foundation Server.

To enable these scenarios, you must install the TFS artifacts for Azure Pipelines extension from Visual Studio Marketplace. Then create a service connection with credentials to connect to your TFS server (see service connections for details).

You can then link a TFS build pipeline to your release pipeline. Choose External TFS Build in the Type list.

The following features are available when using external TFS sources:

FeatureBehavior with external TFS sources
Auto-trigger releasesYou cannot configure a continuous deployment trigger for external TFS sources in a release pipeline. To automatically create a new release when a build is complete, you would need to add a script to your build pipeline in the external TFS server to invoke Azure Pipelines REST APIs and to create a new release.
Artifact variablesA number of artifact variables are supported for external TFS sources.
Work items and commitsAzure Pipelines cannot show work items or commits for external TFS sources.
Artifact downloadBy default, External TFS artifacts are downloaded to the agent. You can configure an option in the stage to skip the download of artifacts.

Artifact Uprising Promo Code

Note

Artifacts

Azure Pipelines may not be able to contact an on-premises TFS server in case it's within your enterprise network. In that case you can integrate Azure Pipelines with TFS by setting up an on-premises agent that can access the TFS server. You will not be able to see the name of your TFS projects or build pipelines when linking to a build, but you can include those variables in the link dialog fields. In addition, when you create a release, Azure Pipelines may not be able to query the TFS server for the build numbers. Instead, enter the Build ID (not the build number) of the desired build in the appropriate field, or select the Latest build.

Artifact sources - TeamCity

Artifactual

To integrate with TeamCity, you must first install the TeamCity artifacts for Azure Pipelines extension from Marketplace.

To consume TeamCity artifacts, start by creating a service connection with credentials to connect to your TeamCity server (see service connections for details).

You can then link a TeamCity build configuration to a release pipeline. The TeamCity build configuration must be configured with an action to publish the artifacts.

The following features are available when using TeamCity sources:

FeatureBehavior with TeamCity sources
Auto-trigger releasesYou cannot configure a continuous deployment trigger for TeamCity sources in a release pipeline. To create a new release automatically when a build is complete, add a script to your TeamCity project that invokes the Azure Pipelines REST APIs to create a new release.
Artifact variablesA number of artifact variables are supported for builds from TeamCity.
Work items and commitsAzure Pipelines cannot show work items or commits for TeamCity builds.
Artifact downloadBy default, TeamCity builds are downloaded to the agent. You can configure an option in the stage to skip the download of artifacts.

Note

Azure Pipelines may not be able to contact your TeamCity server if, for example, it is within your enterprise network. In this case you can integrate Azure Pipelines with TeamCity by setting up an on-premises agent that can access the TeamCity server. You will not be able to see the name of your TeamCity projects when linking to a build, but you can type this into the link dialog field.

Artifact sources - Custom artifacts

In addition to built-in artifact sources, Azure Artifacts supports integrating any custom artifact source with the artifact extensibility model. You can plug in any custom artifact source, and Azure DevOps will provide a first-class user experience and seamless integration.

For more information, see Azure DevOps artifact extensibility model.

Artifact sources - Other sources

Your artifacts may be created and exposed by other types of sources such as a NuGet repository. While we continue to expand the types of artifact sources supported in Azure Pipelines, you can start using it without waiting for support for a specific source type. Simply skip the linking of artifact sources in a release pipeline, and add custom tasks to your stages that download the artifacts directly from your source.

Artifact source alias

To ensure the uniqueness of every artifact download, each artifact source linked to a release pipeline is automatically provided with a specific download location known as the _source alias_. This location can be accessed through the variable:

$(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)[source alias]

This uniqueness also ensures that, if you later rename a linked artifact source in its original location (for example, rename a build pipeline in Azure Pipelines or a projectin Jenkins), you don't need to edit the task properties because the download location defined in the agent does not change.

The source alias is, by default, the name of the source selected when you linked the artifact source, prefixed with an underscore; depending on the type of the artifact source this will be the name of the build pipeline, job, project, or repository. You can edit the source alias from the artifacts tab of a release pipeline; for example, when you change the name of the build pipeline and you want to use a source alias that reflects the name of the build pipeline.

Primary source

When you link multiple artifact sources to a release pipeline, one of them is designated as the primary artifact source. The primary artifact source is used to set a number of pre-defined variables. It can also be used in naming releases.

Artifact download

When you deploy a release to a stage, the versioned artifacts from each of the sources are, by default, downloaded to the automation agent so that tasks running within that stage can deploy these artifacts. The artifacts downloaded to the agent are not deleted when a release is completed. However, when you initiate the next release, the downloaded artifacts are deleted and replaced with the new set of artifacts.

A new unique folder in the agent is created for every release pipeline when you initiate a release, and the artifacts are downloaded into that folder. The $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory) variable maps to this folder.

Azure Pipelines currently does not perform any optimization to avoid downloading the unchanged artifacts if the same release is deployed again. In addition, because the previously downloaded contents are always deleted when you initiate a new release, Azure Pipelines cannot perform incremental downloads to the agent.

You can, however, instruct Azure Pipelines to skip the automatic download of artifacts to the agent for a specific job and stage of the deployment if you wish. Typically, you will do this when the tasks in that job do not require any artifacts, or if you implement custom code in a task to download the artifacts you require.

In Azure Pipelines, you can, however, select which artifacts you want to download to the agent for a specific job and stage of the deployment. Typically, you will do this to improve the efficiency of the deployment pipeline when the tasks in that job do not require all or any of the artifacts, or if you implement custom code in a task to download the artifacts you require.

Artifact variables

Azure Pipelines exposes a set of pre-defined variables that you can access and use in tasks and scripts; for example, when executing PowerShell scripts in deployment jobs. When there are multiple artifact sources linked to a release pipeline, you can access information about each of these. For a list of all pre-defined artifact variables, see variables.

Additional information

Related topics

Help and support

  • See our troubleshooting page
  • Get advice on Stack Overflow,and feel free to post your questions, search for answers, or suggest a feature on our Azure DevOps Developer Community. Support page.
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Comments

Comment by Palathos

Where is the Trader's Hall in Stormwind? The cheese shop is empty but the highlight of the quest tracking is on the cheese shop. How to find Elling Trias?

Comment by ShanksGonnaShank


Artifact Acquisition
Below is the questline for Assassination Rogue to acquire Claws of Ursoc.

It should be The Kingslayers
Claws of Ursoc is the guardian artifact weapon. :D

Comment by militarycop1206

How do i actually get the hidden appearance the ghost blades they are what i want?

Comment by huppcio

Anyone know how to unlock Ghostblade appearance ?

Comment by Doloria

Please add the quest 'Find the herald in Stormwind Keep'

Ancient World Artifact Examples

to the Guide so people can find it using the search engine.
I didn't find this guide or the video until after running this part of the quest over and over. Go to minute 20:32 in the video to see this quest. The route is far more heavily guarded than the video shows. Each time you fail you will be transported back to the Pig & Whistle with damage to your armor.
What didn't work: flying (no fly zone), swimming in the canals (always caught by the elite guard who says 'tighten the defenses'), fighting (you will get swarmed).
The abilities that work: Stealth, Vanish, Sap, Shadowstep, Sprint and Distract (which worked like an aoe sap in this quest). Success is heavily dependant on the cooldowns for Distract and Vanish. You will need Vanish if you are detected - which is frequently.
The most direct route works: Turn right out of the Pig & Whistle, go through the Northwest tunnel, turn right on to the canal path, head straight through the Keep gate, up the right stairs and into the Keep. The herald is in the garden courtyard where the portal to Hyjal used to be.
In detail with spells:
  • Turn right out of the Pig & Whistle. Use Shadowstep on the guard farthest away with his back to you.
  • Go through the northwest tunnel. Use Distract, Vanish and Sprint.
  • Turn right on the walkway running along the canal and wait on the right side of the path near the drunken npc until Distract and Vanish are up.
  • At the gate to the Keep wait until the golden weapon is thrown into the ground by the commander, then use Distract to freeze the guards (or Shadowstep as in the video), Vanish and Sprint to the right.
  • Jump into the bushes while Distract and Vanish reset.
  • Jump back and head up the stairs. Sap the nearest guard at the Keep entrance, use Distract to freeze guards. Vanish and Sprint.
  • Wait to the right of the throne while Distract and Vanish reset.
  • Sap one of the guards or try Shadowstep to get behind the caster who is casting the water spell (like the wind trap in Auchindoun).
  • If you get caught in the water spell keep running forward and you will get through it.
  • Scenario starts.

Comment by Jollygood

I'm not as good a player as most due to age and poor reflexes. Here are some tips for spazzes like me.
I personally, ran my rogue in her underwear until the last scene. I did leave the blades in her hands, which is why I bothered with repairs at all. So, repairs...
When you rez at the Pig and Whistle, you can crowd yourself into the doorway a bit and summon your repair mount to do a quick repair. If you're just having a tough time after you've established your rez spot there, that's my tip.
The guys with the blue eye over them. You can shadowstep them and sap them. Most of the time it works. If not, you're in your underwear. If you can't vanish, let them finish and repair on the pub steps.
Shadowstep behind the paladin at the bridge and stun the far left guard to get past them.
Stun, stun, stun. The guys who did the videos did not stun nearly as much as I did. Stun stun stun will get you past a lot.
Also, there are a few spots where you can hang out and let your cooldowns reset. The cheese shop, the pub, across from the paladin, some grassy spots on the lawn in the castle keep.
To get past the windy stuff inside, you can shadowstep. You get pulled into a cinematic you can't get out of. It's OK. You do have time to re-equip your armor once the dog and pony show is done.
So, if you're having trouble, take heart. I'm a terrible player and did it with shadowstep and stun on the blue eye guys, stunning everyone else, using smoke bombs, and running it in my troll panties. I will say it was the hardest one so far. My DH, hunter, monk and warlock just facerolled theirs.

Comment by SFFCorgi

I actually found getting from the cheese shop to the Canals on the way to the Pig & Whistle to be the hardest part. My timing was awful with the Truesighted guards at the bottleneck area just before the passage between the Trade District and the Canals. Once I got out clean, I was all right, especially with the advice in this thread.

Comment by Lainea

I did this scenario/questline in outlaw spec as I had no other weapons. On the part in the keep where you need to get past the fatigued guy/the shadowy stuff just before the end boss, I bribed one of the guards standing there and sent him to attack the fatigued guy. Shadowy stuff disappeared and I was able to walk right in. Just a tip for those in outlaw who don't know the spec well and don't have shadowstep

Comment by Arrohon

Unlike other many other artifact guides, this one is lacking links to the dressing room of the transmog suggestions. Those are incredibly useful in choosing what appearance to aim for.

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